Skip navigation

Professor

University of Central Oklahoma
edadlez@uco.edu (405) 974-5636 Humanities and Philosophy LAR 205A , Box 184

About

E.M. Dadlez is a professor of philosophy at the University of Central Oklahoma. She received her Ph.D. from Syracuse University. She writes on issues at the intersection (often at the collision) of aesthetics, ethics and epistemology. She has written two books on the preceding: What's Hecuba to Him? Fictional Events and Actual Emotions (1997) and Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume (2009), as well as numerous journal articles and book chapters. She has also edited a collection entitled Jane Austen's Emma: Philosophical Perspectives for Oxford University Press. Dadlez is a feminist ethics dilettante and occasional novelist. She has indulged in the composition of a mean-spirited academic satire (The Sleep of Reason) that lampoons higher education in America. She also draws a lot.

Classes Taught

  • The Philosophy of Fiction (PHIL 4913/PHIL 5913/ENG 5913, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Visions of Dystopia (PHIL 4911, University of Central Oklahoma, Team leader)
  • The Philosophy of Horror (PHIL 4921/ENG 5911University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Major Figures in Aesthetics (PHI 395, Syracuse University)
  • Epistemology (PHIL 4913, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Theory of Knowledge (PHIL 3993, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • History of Philosophy: Modern (PHIL 2183, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Philosophy of Emotion (PHIL 3993, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Ethical Theory (PHIL 3103, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Ethics and Value Theory (PHI 191, Syracuse University)
  • Contemporary Moral Problems (PHIL 1123, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Medical Ethics (PHIL 3513/PHIL 5913 University of Central Oklahoma; PHIL 230, Ithaca College; PHIL 245, Cornell University)
  • Dying and Death (PHIL 3533, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Women and Values (PHIL 4203/PHIL 5913, University of Central Oklahoma; PHIL 276, Ithaca College)
  • Rights and Reproduction (PHIL 4913, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Women: 1870-1938 (HUM 4911, University of Central Oklahoma, Team member)
  • Scholarship/Leadership (PHIL 2003, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 1113, University of Central Oklahoma; PHIL 101, Ithaca College)
  • Theories of Knowledge and Reality (PHI 187, Syracuse University)
  • Critical Reasoning (PHIL 151, Ithaca College)
  • Writing and Philosophical Analysis (PHI 102, Syracuse University)
  • Writing Studios I and II (WRT 105/205, Syracuse University)
  • General Essays, Literature, Poetry (ENG 101/102, Syracuse University)
  • The Philosophy of Fiction (PHIL 4913/PHIL 5913/ENG 5913, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Visions of Dystopia (PHIL 4911, University of Central Oklahoma, Team leader)
  • The Philosophy of Horror (PHIL 4921/ENG 5911University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Major Figures in Aesthetics (PHI 395, Syracuse University)
  • Epistemology (PHIL 4913, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Theory of Knowledge (PHIL 3993, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • History of Philosophy: Modern (PHIL 2183, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Philosophy of Emotion (PHIL 3993, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Ethical Theory (PHIL 3103, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Ethics and Value Theory (PHI 191, Syracuse University)
  • Contemporary Moral Problems (PHIL 1123, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Medical Ethics (PHIL 3513/PHIL 5913 University of Central Oklahoma; PHIL 230, Ithaca College; PHIL 245, Cornell University)
  • Dying and Death (PHIL 3533, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Women and Values (PHIL 4203/PHIL 5913, University of Central Oklahoma; PHIL 276, Ithaca College)
  • Rights and Reproduction (PHIL 4913, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Women: 1870-1938 (HUM 4911, University of Central Oklahoma, Team member)
  • Scholarship/Leadership (PHIL 2003, University of Central Oklahoma)
  • Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 1113, University of Central Oklahoma; PHIL 101, Ithaca College)
  • Theories of Knowledge and Reality (PHI 187, Syracuse University)
  • Critical Reasoning (PHIL 151, Ithaca College)
  • Writing and Philosophical Analysis (PHI 102, Syracuse University)
  • Writing Studios I and II (WRT 105/205, Syracuse University)
  • General Essays, Literature, Poetry (ENG 101/102, Syracuse University)

Education and Certifications

PhD     Philosophy, Syracuse University Department of Philosophy, 1991.

MA      Philosophy, Syracuse University Department of Philosophy, 1986.

MLS    Library Science, Syracuse University Dept. of Information Studies, 1982.

BA       Creative Writing/English, Syracuse University Department of English, 1978.

Experience

2002-present    Professor, University of Central Oklahoma, Department of Humanities and Philosophy

1998-2002       Associate Professor, University of Central Oklahoma, Department of Humanities and Philosophy

1993-1998       Assistant Professor, University of Central Oklahoma, Department of Humanities and Philosophy

1992-1993       Assistant Professor, Ithaca College, Department of Philosophy and Religion

1991                Part-Time Instructor, Syracuse University, Department of Philosophy

1990-1991       Philosophy Writing Consultant, Syracuse University, Department of Philosophy

1989-1992       Professional Writing Instructor, Syracuse University Writing Program

1989                Teaching Associate, Cornell University, Department of Philosophy

1988-1989       Part-Time Instructor, Syracuse University, Department of Philosophy

1987-1988       Teaching Assistant, Syracuse University, Department of Philosophy

1986                Teaching Fellow, Syracuse University, Graduate School, Teaching Assistant Program

1984-1986       Teaching Assistant, Syracuse University, Departments of Philosophy and English

Honors and Awards

2015    Aesthetics for Birds “Fab Flock Five” Award (recognizing excellent work in aesthetics)

2015    Hubert Griggs Alexander Memorial Award. New Mexico-Texas Philosophical Society.

2014    Liberal Arts Outstanding Scholarship Award. University of Central Oklahoma.

2013    Faculty Merit-Credit Award, University of Central Oklahoma.

2013    Scholarship Merit Award, University of Central Oklahoma

2010    NEH Review Panel Appointment. Member of Review Panel for evaluation and selection of NEH  awards for Faculty in Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts. Panel service: 8/10.

2008/9 Faculty Merit-Credit Award: Scholarly/Creative Activity, University of Central Oklahoma.

2008/9 Liberal Arts Outstanding Scholarship Award. University of Central Oklahoma.

2007    NEH Award. Summer Seminar on the Aesthetics of the Scottish Enlightenment and Beyond (Rachel Zuckert and Paul Guyer). St. Andrews University, Scotland. 7/07-8/07.

2005/6 Liberal Arts Faculty Member of the Year. University of Central Oklahoma.

2006    Liberal Arts Conference Travel Grant. University of Central Oklahoma.

2005    Sabbatical Leave. One year duration. University of Central Oklahoma.

2005    Faculty Merit-Credit Award, University of Central Oklahoma.

2004    NEH Review Panel Appointment. Member of Review Panel for the Humanities Faculty Research Awards competition. Panel Service: 8/04.

2004    AAUP Distinguished Scholar Award, University of Central Oklahoma Chapter of the American Association of University Professors.

2002    NEH Review Panel Appointment. Member of Review Panel for evaluation and selection of NEH Seminars and Institutes to be held in the year 2003. Panel Service: 5/02.

2000    Faculty Merit-Credit Award, University of Central Oklahoma.

1999    Hauptman Fellowship Award for the College of Liberal Arts, Research Advisory Council, University of Central Oklahoma.

1999    Outstanding Achievement in Scholarly Activity: Nominee and Finalist for the Distinguished Scholar Award of the University of Central Oklahoma Chapter of the AAUP.

1997    NEH Award, Summer Seminar on Objectivity and Emotion in Practical Reasoning (Simon Blackburn). University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC. 6/97-8/97.

1997    Faculty Merit-Credit Award, University of Central Oklahoma.

1992    Doctoral Prize, Syracuse University Graduate School.

1987    All-University Masters Thesis Prize, Humanities, Syracuse University Graduate School.

1987    Teaching Fellow Appointment (recognition of achievements in teaching). Teaching Assistant Program of the Syracuse University Graduate School.

Research, Published Work, and Scholarly Activities

Books

Jane Austen’s Emma: Philosophical Perspectives (edited collection). Oxford University Press. Oxford Studies in Philosophy and Literature series. November 2018.

Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume. Wiley‑Blackwell. New Directions in Aesthetics series. 2009. Reviewed in: Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Times Literary Supplement; Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews; Hume Studies; Philosophical Quarterly; Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 

What's Hecuba to Him? Fictional Events and Actual Emotions. Penn State Press. Literature and Philosophy series. 1997. Reviewed in: British Journal of Aesthetics

Articles

Comment on “Fashion and the Judgment of Taste: Coming to Terms with Kant” by Kenneth L. Brewer. Southwest Philosophy Review (2019). Forthcoming.

“Cake as Speech and Cake as Art in Colorado,” The Philosophers’ Magazine. Forthcoming.

“Kitsch and Bullshit as Aesthetic and Epistemic Transgressions,” Southwest Philosophy Review 34:1 (2018). Forthcoming.

“Comedy and Tragedy as Two Sides of the Same Coin: Reversal and Incongruity as Sources of Insight,” with Daniel Lüthi. Journal of Aesthetic Education (2018). Forthcoming.

“Hume Halos, and Rough Heroes: Moral and Aesthetic Defects in Works of Fiction,” Philosophy and Literature 41:1 (2017): 91-102.

Comment on “Solving the Puzzle of Aesthetic Assertion” by Andrew Morgan. Southwest Philosophy Review 33:2 (2017). Forthcoming.

“Rights of Passage: The Ethics of Disability Passing and Repercussions for Identity,” with Sarah H. Woolwine. Res Philosophica 94:4 (2016): 951-969.

“Disgust, Appreciation, and Hume’s Emotional Conversion,” Southwest Philosophical Studies 38 (2016).

“Comment on “Standing Conditions and Blame” by Amy McKiernan,” Southwest Philosophy Review 32:2 (2016): 49-52.

"Fictional Objects, Future Objectives: Why Existence Matters Less than You Think," with Chelsea Haramia. Philosophy and Literature 39: 1 (2015): A1-A15.

“Ink, Art and Expression: Philosophical Questions about Tattoos,” Philosophy Compass 10:11 (October 2015).

 “Thinking Hypothetically about Hypothesis-Testing in the Humanities: Response to Ryan Nichols,” Southwest Philosophy Review 31:1 (2015): 21-28.

“Gender and Moral Virtue in Kant’s Critique of Judgment: The Third Critique as a Template for Identifying Feminine Deficit,” with Sarah Woolwine. Southwest Philosophy Review 31:1 (2015): 109-118.

Comment on James Rocha’s “Forced to Listen to the Heart: Fetal Heartbeat Laws and Autonomous Abortions.” Southwest Philosophy Review 20:2 (2014) pp. 51-54.

“When Complementarianism becomes Gender Apartheid,” with Sarah Woolwine, Southwest Philosophy Review 30:1 (2014): 195-203.

“Literature, Ethical Thought Experiments, and Moral Knowledge,” Southwest Philosophy Review 29:1 (2013): 195-209.

“Not Moderately Moral: Why Hume is not a ‘Moderate Moralist’,” with Jeanette Bicknell. Philosophy and Literature (2013) 37: 330–342.

“Poetry Is What Gets Lost in Translation,” Art and Philosophy 42 (2013) 86-92.

“Fetal Pain Legislation and the Abortion Debate,” (Presidential Address). Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (January 2012) 1-14.

“Not Separate but not Equal: How Fetal Rights Deprive Women of Civil Rights,” with William L. Andrews. Public Affairs Quarterly 26:2 (April 2012): 103-122.

Comment on Duncan Purves’“Still in Hot Water: Doing, Allowing, and Rachels’ Bathtub Cases” Southwest Philosophy Review 27: 2 (2011).

“Ideal Presence: How Kames Solved the Problem of Fiction and Emotion,” Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9:1 (March 2011): 115-133.

“Truly Funny: Irony and Satire as Moral Criticism,” Journal of Aesthetic Education 45:1 (Spring 2011).

“Post-Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction,” with William L. Andrews. Bioethics 24:9 (November 2010):  445-452.

“Federally Funded Elective Abortion: They Can Run, but They Can’t Hyde,” with William L. Andrews. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24:2 (Fall 2010): 169-184.

“Seeing and Imagination: Emotional Response to Fictional Film,” Midwest Studies in Philosophy, “Film and Emotions,” Volume XXXIV: 1 (2010): 120-135.

“Kames on Ideal Presence: Revisiting the Problem of Fiction and Emotion,” Southwest Philosophy Review (January 2010).

Comment on Rachel Zuckert’s “Kames’s Naturalist Aesthetics and the Case of Tragedy,” Journal of Scottish Philosophy Forum 7.2 (2009).

"Rape, Evolution, and Pseudoscience: Natural Selection in the Academy," with William L. Andrews, Courtney Lewis, and Marissa Stroud. Journal of Social Philosophy 40:1 (2009): 75-96.

“Comment on Deborah K. Heikes’ Let’s Be Reasonable: Feminism and Rationality,” Southwest Philosophy Review (July 2009).

"Form Affects Content: Reading Jane Austen," Philosophy and Literature. 32.2 (Oct. 2008): 315-329.

“Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen.” Journal of Aesthetic Education 42.1 (Spring 2008): 46-62.

“Only Kidding: the Connection between Amusement and Our Attitudes.” In Southwest Philosophy Review, 22: 2 (2006): 1-16.

"Dense Insensibility: Hume's Vices and Virtues in the Work of Jane Austen." Included in an invited collection edited by myself and James W. Mock for the annual 1650-1850, v. 12 (2006): 147-174.

“Spectacularly Bad: Hume and Aristotle on Tragic Spectacle." The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63:4 (2005): 351-358.

"Knowing Better: The Epistemic Underpinnings of Moral Criticism of Fiction." Southwest Philosophy Review, 21:1 (2005): 35-44.

"Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure." Hume Studies, 30:2 (November 2004): 213-236.

"A Common Sense and Point of View." 1650-1850, v. 8 (2002): 1-20.

"The Vicious Habits of Entirely Fictive People: Hume on the Moral Evaluation of Art." Philosophy and Literature 26 (2002): 38-51.

"Of Two Minds: Plato's Analogy between Painting and Poetry." Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2002): 187-192.

"Quasi Fearing Fictions." Film and Philosophy 5/6 (2001/2): 1-13.

"The Beautiful and the Good." Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1999): 99-106.

"Plato" (encyclopedia entry). Magill's Ready Reference: Censorship. Salem Press (1997).

"Fiction, Emotion, and Irrationality," British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (1996): 292-306.

Chapters

“Thoughtful Films, Thoughtful Fictions: The Philosophical Terrain between Illustrations and Thought Experiments.” The Palgrave Handbook for the Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures. Edited by Noel Carroll, Laura Teresa Di Summa-Knoop, and Shawn Loht. Palgrave Macmillan. Forthcoming.

“The Practical Advantages of Pride and the Risks of Humility: The Defense of Pride Occasionally Found in the Work of David Hume and Jane Austen.” In Pride (Moral Psychology of the Emotions series). Edited by J. Adam Carter and Emma C. Gordon. Rowman and Littlefield. Forthcoming.

“Building Character: Shakespearean Characters and Their Instantiations in the Worlds of Performances.” In The Routledge Companion to Shakespeare and Philosophy. Edited by Craig Bourne and Emily Caddick Bourne. Routledge. Forthcoming.

“Legislating Pain Capability: Sentience and the Abortion Debate.” With William L. Andrews. In Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Edited by Gregg D. Caruso. Palgrave Macmillan (2018) pp. 661-675.  

“Virtual Reality and ‘Knowing What It’s Like’: The Epistemic Upside of Experience Machines.” In Experience Machines: The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds. Edited by Mark Silcox. Rowman and Littlefield. Forthcoming.

”Valar Morghulis: Arya Stark as Humean Rough Hero.” In The Ultimate Game of Thrones and Philosophy. Edited by Eric J. Silverman and Robert Arp. Open Court. Forthcoming.

“Jane Austen on Moral Luck.” In Jane Austen and Philosophy. Edited by Mimi Marinucci. Rowan and Littlefield. Forthcoming.

“Make-Believe Wickedness v. Wicked Making-Believe: RPGs, Imagination and Moral Complicity.” In How to Make-Believe: the Fictional Truths of the Representational Arts.  Edited by J. Alexander Bareis. De Gruyter, Narratologia. Forthcoming.

 “A Humean Approach to the Problem of Disgust and Aesthetic Appreciation.” In Essays in Philosophy (2016) 17:1, 55-67.

 “Fiction and Negative Emotions.” In The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Literature. Edited by Noel Carroll and John Gibson. Routledge, 2016. Part 3: 22.

“Eighteenth Century British Philosophers on Tragedy.” In The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the 18th Century. Edited by James Harris. Oxford University Press, 2013. 19.

“Being Evil.” In Dungeons and Dragons and Philosophy. Edited by Jon Cogburn and Mark Silcox. Open Court (2012): 65-74.

“Paradox and Transcendence in Alien3: Ripley Through the Eyes of Simone de Beauvoir.” In  Meanings of Ripley:The Alien Quadrilogy and Gender. Edited by Lisa Robson and Elizabeth Graham. Cambridge Scholars Press (2010): 117-126.

"It Don't Come Easy v. Taking It Easy: Two Radically Different Reflections on Utilitarianism and the Blues," with Michael F. Patton, Jr. In The Beautiful, the Sublime, and the Grotesque:  The Subjective Turn in Aesthetics from the Enlightenment to the Present. Edited by Michael Matthis. Cambridge Scholars Press (2010): 85-98. 

"Going to the Devil: Lewis' Science Fiction and Academic Postmodernism." In The Beautiful, the Sublime, and the Grotesque: The Subjective Turn in Aesthetics from the Enlightenment to the Present. Edited by Michael Matthis. Cambridge Scholars Press (2010): 117-126. 

"Museum as Moral Agent.” In The Beautiful, the Sublime, and the Grotesque. Edited by Michael Matthis. Cambridge Scholars Press (2010): 99-106. 

“David Hume and Jane Austen on Pride: Ethics in the Enlightenment.”In Theory and Practice in Eighteenth Century Britain: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Edited by Christina Lupton and Alex J. Dick. Pickering and Chatto Publishers Ltd. (2008): 123-137.

Reviews

Review of Waxler, Robert P.  The Risk of Reading: How Literature Helps Us to Understand Ourselves and the World. (Bloomsbury). Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism. 74:3, 2016.

Review of Hagberg, Garry L. and Walter Jost, eds., A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature (Wiley-Blackwell). Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70:2, 2012.

Review of Elizabeth S. Radcliffe, ed., A Companion to Hume (Blackwell). Religion in the Age of Enlightenment v. 1, 2009.

Review of Richard Jenkyns,  A Fine Brush on Ivory: An Appreciation of Jane Austen (Oxford University Press). Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64:3, 2006.

Review of D.A. Miller, Jane Austen, or the Secret of Style (Princeton University Press). Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64:3, 2006.

Review of Frank Kermode, Pleasure and Change: The Aesthetics of Canon (Oxford University Press). Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64:2, 2006.

The views expressed by UCO faculty and staff on their personal websites and social media pages do not necessarily reflect the positions of the University of Central Oklahoma. UCO faculty and staff are advised to follow the university’s social media guidelines and are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with policies outlined in UCO’s Employee Handbook and/or Faculty Handbook.