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UCO Assistant Professor Named VIPEr Fellow for National Chemistry Study

Headshot of Eric Eitrheim, Ph.D.

July 2, 2019

Media Contact: Sarah Ward, Communications and Marketing Coordinator, UCO University Communications, 405-974-2106, sward24@uco.edu

UCO Assistant Professor Named VIPEr Fellow for National Chemistry Study

Eric Eitrheim, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry in the College of Mathematics and Science at the University of Central Oklahoma, was recently named a Virtual, Inorganic, Pedagogical, Electronic Resource (VIPEr) Fellow in an innovative national study.

The study, Improving Inorganic Chemistry Education, is led by the Interactive Online Network of Inorganic Chemists (IONiC) with support from the National Science Foundation’s Improving Undergraduate STEM Education program.

“I am excited to work on this multi-institutional effort to advance inorganic chemical education,” said Eitrheim.

“Being quite new to teaching, I see this as a great way to see what others are doing and critically approach the way in which I will teach inorganic chemistry in the future.”

The study will use classroom observations, analysis of student work, student surveys and faculty interviews to study how changes in the classroom affect student learning, interest and motivation.

As one of the first 20 faculty selected for this ground-breaking project, he will join other inorganic chemists from across the country in a community of practice dedicated to improving student learning.

To learn more about the project, visit www.ionicviper.org/VIPErFellows. For more information about Central, visit www.uco.edu.

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Cutline: Eric Eitrheim, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry in the College of Mathematics and Science at the University of Central Oklahoma, was recently named a Virtual, Inorganic, Pedagogical, Electronic Resource (VIPEr) Fellow in an innovative national study.